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The History of Ink

the

HISTORY OF INK



Ir has a large impact on our daily lives; it�۪s something usually goes unnoticed, and we often take the use of ink for granted. Ink has left its mark on everything from religious manuscripts to fortune cookies. Ancient cultures would work toward creating primitive forms of ink to paint on cave walls, animal skins, and even on their own bodies. Have you ever wondered where ink comes from? How has it evolved into the common forms we use today?



THERE ARE 3 BASIC TYPES OF INKS. ONE USING PIGMENTS AND A BINDER. ANOTHER USES DYES LIKE THAT FOUND IN A FOUNTAIN PEN. AND THE LAST, USES A CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION SUCH AS IRON GALL INK.



START HERE



LAMP BLACK

The soot collected from oil lamps



2500 BC

Ancient EGYPTIAN and CHINESE

civilizations both developed ink around

this time. They created ink using fine

carbon particles, or lamp black. These

early pioneers also worked with gums or

glues to act as a bonding agent.



ALTHOUGH INVENTED IN CHINA, INDIA INK

GOT ITS NAME BECAUSE THE SOURCE OF

THE MATERIALS USED TO CREATE THE INK

CAME FROM INDIA.





23RD CENTURY BC



The Chinese would grind natural

plant dyes and minerals with water,

then applied it to ink brushes.





4TH CENTURY BC



INDIA INK becomes a

popular medium in China.

India ink is made of burnt

bones, tar and pitch - usually

written with a sharp

pointed needle.



3RD CENTURY BC - 68 AD



Earliest examples of India ink were

found on the DEAD SEA SCROLLS: a

collection of biblical manuscripts found

northeast of the Dead Sea.



FIRST CENTURIES BC



PAPYRUS SCROLLS, made of the pith of

a papyrus plant, gained popularity as a

writing surface in Egypt.



CARBON INKS



Made of lamp black or soot

and bound with gum Arabic or

animal glue



800-1500 AD



In Medieval Europe, scribes

used PARCHMENT or

VELLUM as a writing surface

(cotton was considered 5TH-15TH CENTURY AD

low quality).



5TH-15TH CENTURY



During the Middle Ages, carbon inks and

iron gall inks were in common use.



IRON GALL INK



Ink made of iron salts and tannic acids from

vegetable sources. standard ink in Europe from,j



6TH CENTURY AD



The invention of the QUILL PEN. Made of a molted fligtt

feather, the quill pen was the primary writing utensil in

the Western World from 6th century to the 19th century

and was compatible with parchment and vellum.





953 AD

The RESERVOIR PEN (known as the first fountain 1

pen) was invented as a result of an Egyptian ruler

demanding a pen that would not stain his clothes.



WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ATTESTS TO THE USE OF

IRON GALL INK IN HIS PLAY, TWELFTH NIGHT,

WRITTEN AROUND 1602.



15TH CENTURY



JOHANNES GUTENBERG invented

an oil-based ink that was more

suitable than the water-based inks

of the time for printing with the

metal type of his printing press.



1856 AD



English chemist WILLIAM HENRY PERKIN, while

trying to find a cure for malaria, discovered synthetic

dyes that could be applied to ink. This would later

become commercially relevant for dyeing ink.



1890 AD



German chemists Schlutigg and

Neumann PUBLISHED A

FORMULA which they thought was

me best recipe for iron gall ink.





SECRET INK



(Also known as invisible ink)

Invisible ink, on application or soon

after, can be revealed by adding heat,

ultraviolet light, or a chemical

reaction."



WITH THE EXCEPTION OF COLOR, TODAY�۪S INK

SHARES NOTHING IN COMMON WITH THOSE

USED BY ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS.







19TH CENTURY AD

Many artists developed a

process for a four-color print.

Before digital printing, an image 1912 AD

was photographed 3 times with

a filter for each color. Today, this

printing technique is referred to

as CMYK or FOUR-COLOR

PROCESS.





1912 AD



Schlutigg and Neumann�۪s

formula was adopted by the

state of Massachusetts as a

standard ink for all official

documents and was soon

adopted by the United States

government.





CMYK



Refers to the four inks used in the

four-color printing process: cyan,

magenta, yellow, and key (or black).





CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK



1970's



INKJET PRINTERS wore developed

by Hewlett-Packard, Epson, and

Canon. Along with these printers

came different types of ink: solvent,

aqueous. UV-curable, and dye

sublimation inks.





SOLID INK



Is technology used in computer printers. It is

created by melting ink sticks that are loaded into

a printer - a process similar to offset printing





InkTechnologies.com

SAVING YOU MONEY WITH EVERY PRINT the HISTORY OFIINK Ink has a large impact on our daily lives; it's something that usually goes unnoticed, and we often take the use of ink for granted. Ink has left its mark on evérything fror religious manuscripts to fortune cookies. Ancient cultures would work toward creating primitive forms of ink to paint on cave walls, animal skins, and even on their own bodies. Have you ever wondered where ink comes from? How has it evolved into the common forms we use today? START HERE THERE ARE 3 BASIC TYPES OF INKS. ONE USING PIGMENTS AND A BINDER. ANOTHER USES DYES LIKE THAT FOUND IN A FOUNTAIN PEN. AND THE LAST, USES A CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION SUCH AS IRON GALL INK. LAMP BLACK The soot collected from oil lamps, 2500 BC 23RD CENTURY BC Ancient EGYPTIAN and CHINESE civilizations both developed ink around this time. They created ink using fine carbon particles, or lamp black. These early pioneers also worked with gums or glues to act as a bonding agent. The Chinese would grind natural plant dyes and minerals with water, then applied it to ink brushes. ALTHOUGH INVENTED IN CHINA, INDIA INK GOT ITS NAME BECAUSE THE SOURCE OF THE MATERIALS USED TO CREATE THE INK CAME FROM INDIA. 4TH CENTURY BC INDIA INK becomes a popular medium in China. India ink is made of burnt bones, tar and pitch - usually written with a sharp pointed needle.. 3RD CENTURY BC - 68 AD -------------------- Earliest examples of India ink were found on the DEAD SEA SCROLLS: a collection of biblical manuscripts found northeast of the Dead Sea. FIRST CENTURIES BC PAPYRUS SCROLLS, made of the pith of a papyrus plant, gained popularity as a writing surface in Egypt. CARBON INKS 800-1500 AD Made of lamp black or soot and bound with gum Arabic or animal glue. In Medieval Europe, scribes used PARCHMENT or VELLUM as a writing surface (cotton was considered low quality). 5TH-15TH CENTURY AD ------ ------- During the Middle Ages, carbon inks and iron gall inks were in common use. IRON GALL INK Ink made of iron salts and tannic acids from vegetable sources. standard ink in Europe from 12th century to the 19th century. 6TH CENTURY AD .----- ----------- -------- The invention of the QUILL PEN. Made of a molted flight feather, the quill pen was the primary writing utensil in the Western World from 6th century to the 19th century and was compatible with parchment and vellum. 953 AD The RESERVOIR PEN (known as the first fountain pen) was invented as a result of an Egyptian ruler demanding a pen that would not stain his clothes. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ATTESTS TO THE USE OF IRON GALL INK IN HIS PLAY, TWELFTH NIGHT, WRITTEN AROUND 1602. 15TH CENTURY ----- ------ ----- ---- JOHANNES GUTENBERG invented an oil-based ink that was more suitable than the water-based inks of the time for printing with the metal type of his printing press. 1856 AD English chemist WILLIAM HENRY PERKIN, while trying to find a cure for malaria, discovered synthetic dyes that could be applied to ink. This would later become commercially relevant for dyeing ink. 1890 AD .----- ------- German chemists Schlutigg and SECRET INK Neumann PUBLISHED A (Also known as invisible ink) Invisible ink, on application or soon after, can be revealed by adding heat, ultraviolet light, or a chemical reaction." FORMULA which they thought was the best recipe for iron gall ink. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF COLOR, TODAY'S INK SHARES NOTHING IN COMMON WITH THOSE USED BY ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS. 19TH CENTURY AD Many artists developed a process for a four-color print. Before digital printing, an image was photographed 3 times with a filter for each color. Today, this printing technique is referred to as CMYK or FOUR-COLOR | 1912 AD Schlutigg and Neumann's formula was adopted by the state of Massachusetts as a standard ink for all official documents and was soon PROCESS. adopted by the United States government. CMYK Refers to the four inks used in the four-color printing process: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (or black). 1970'S CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK INKJET PRINTERS were developed by Hewlett-Packard, Epson, and Canon. Along with these printers came different types of ink: solvent, aqueous, UV-curable, and dye sublimation inks. SOLID INK Is technology used in computer printers. It is created by melting ink sticks that are loaded into a printer - a process similar to offset printing. InkTechnologies.com SAVING YOU MONEY WITH EVERY PRINT!

The History of Ink

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The huge impact of ink on our daily lives has gone mostly unnoticed. What would the world be like without it? Learn about the evolution of ink from the caveman through today's newest ink technology.

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