Click me
Transcript

Radiation Dose Chart

Radiation Dose Chart This is a chart of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the cells of the body. One sievert (all at once) will make you sick, and too many more will kill you, but we safely absorb small amounts of natural radiation dai ly. Note: The same number of sieverts absorbed in a shorter time will generally cause more damage, but your cumulative long-term dose plays a big role in things like cancer risk. Bn EPA yearly release target for D a nuclear power plant (30 uSv) I Sleeping next to someone (0.05 uSv) O Chest x-ray (20 uSv) Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant for a year (0.09 uSv) ALl the doses in the blue Ha chart combined (-60 uSv) Dose from spending an hour on the grounds at the Chernobyi plant in 2010 (6 mSv in one spot, but varies wildly) E Eating one banana (0.1 HSV) Extra dose to Tokyo in weeks following i Fukushima accident (40 mSv) Living within 50 miles of a coal power plant for a year (0.3 HSv) Living in a stone, brick, or concrete 品 bui lding for a year (70 uSv) Arm x-ray (1 HSv) Using a CRT monitor for a year (1 uSv) Average total dose from the Three HH Mile island accident to someone living within 10 miles (80 uSv) Extra dose from spending one day in an area with higher-than-average natural background radiation, such as the Colorado plateau (1.2 uSv) Chest CT scan (7 mSv) Approximate total dose received at Fukushima Town Hall over two weeks following accident (100 uSv) EPA year ly release limit for a nuclear Maximum year ly dose permitted for US radiation workers (50 mSv) Dental x-ray (5 uSv) power plant (250 HSv) Year ly dose from natural potassium in the body (390 uSv) Mammogram (400 usv) Background dose received by an average person over one normal day (10 HSv) EPA year ly limit on radiation exposure to a single member of the public (1 mSv-1,000 HSV) Maximum external dose from Three Mile Island accident (1 mSv) Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 uSv) Typical dose over two weeks in Fuku- shima Exclusion Zone (1 mSv, but areas northwest saw far higher doses) Head CT Scan (2 mSv) Normal year ly background dose. About 85% is from natural sources. Near ly all of the rest is from medical scans (~4 mSv) Using a cell phone (0 uSv)-a cell phone's transmitter does not produce ionizing radiation* and does not cause cancer. * Unless it's a bananaphone. (0.05 uSv) Radiation worker one-year dose limit (50 mSv) Approximate total dos one station at the north- west edge of the Fukushima exclusion zone (40 mSv) O * ALl doses in green chart combined (~75 mSv) Lowest one-year dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk (100 mSv) = o (20 uSV) O (10 mSv) Dose causing symptoms of radiation poisoning if received in a short time (400 mSv, but varies) Dose received by two Fukushima plant workers (180 mSv) EPA quidelines for emergency situations, provided to ensure quick decision-making: Severe radiation = o (1 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers protecting valuable property (100 mSv) poisoning, in some cases fatal (2000 mSv, 2 Sv) Ten minutes next to the Chernobyl reactor core af ter explosion and meltdown (50 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers in lifesaving operations (250 mSv) Usually fatal radiation poisoning. Survival occa- sionally possible with prompt treatment (4 Sv" Sources: Fatal dose, even with treatment (8 Sv) http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ctr/parto20/ www.nema.ne.gov/technological/dose-limits.html http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/dose-calculator.cfm http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/radiation_guide.cfm http://mitnse.com/ http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/Chapter_8.pdf http://dels-old.nas.edu/dels/rpt_briefs/rerf-final.pdf http://people.reed.edu/"emcmanis/radiation.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert http://blog.vornaskotti.com/2010/07/15/into-the-zone-chernobyl-pripyat/ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/tzact-sheets/tritium-radiation-fs.html http://www.mext.go.jp/component/a_menu/other/detail/--icsFiles/afieldfile/2011/03/18/1303727-1716.pdf http://radiology.rsna.org/content/248/1/254 Chart by Randall Munroe, with help from Ellen, Senior Reactor Operator at the Reed Research Reactor, who suggested the idea and provided a lot of the sources. I'm sure I've added in lots of mistakes; it's for general education only. If you're basing radiation safety procedures on an internet PNG image and things go wrong, you have no one to blame but yourself. Radiation Dose Chart This is a chart of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the cells of the body. One sievert (all at once) will make you sick, and too many more will kill you, but we safely absorb small amounts of natural radiation dai ly. Note: The same number of sieverts absorbed in a shorter time will generally cause more damage, but your cumulative long-term dose plays a big role in things like cancer risk. Bn EPA yearly release target for D a nuclear power plant (30 uSv) I Sleeping next to someone (0.05 uSv) O Chest x-ray (20 uSv) Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant for a year (0.09 uSv) ALl the doses in the blue Ha chart combined (-60 uSv) Dose from spending an hour on the grounds at the Chernobyi plant in 2010 (6 mSv in one spot, but varies wildly) E Eating one banana (0.1 HSV) Extra dose to Tokyo in weeks following i Fukushima accident (40 mSv) Living within 50 miles of a coal power plant for a year (0.3 HSv) Living in a stone, brick, or concrete 品 bui lding for a year (70 uSv) Arm x-ray (1 HSv) Using a CRT monitor for a year (1 uSv) Average total dose from the Three HH Mile island accident to someone living within 10 miles (80 uSv) Extra dose from spending one day in an area with higher-than-average natural background radiation, such as the Colorado plateau (1.2 uSv) Chest CT scan (7 mSv) Approximate total dose received at Fukushima Town Hall over two weeks following accident (100 uSv) EPA year ly release limit for a nuclear Maximum year ly dose permitted for US radiation workers (50 mSv) Dental x-ray (5 uSv) power plant (250 HSv) Year ly dose from natural potassium in the body (390 uSv) Mammogram (400 usv) Background dose received by an average person over one normal day (10 HSv) EPA year ly limit on radiation exposure to a single member of the public (1 mSv-1,000 HSV) Maximum external dose from Three Mile Island accident (1 mSv) Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 uSv) Typical dose over two weeks in Fuku- shima Exclusion Zone (1 mSv, but areas northwest saw far higher doses) Head CT Scan (2 mSv) Normal year ly background dose. About 85% is from natural sources. Near ly all of the rest is from medical scans (~4 mSv) Using a cell phone (0 uSv)-a cell phone's transmitter does not produce ionizing radiation* and does not cause cancer. * Unless it's a bananaphone. (0.05 uSv) Radiation worker one-year dose limit (50 mSv) Approximate total dos one station at the north- west edge of the Fukushima exclusion zone (40 mSv) O * ALl doses in green chart combined (~75 mSv) Lowest one-year dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk (100 mSv) = o (20 uSV) O (10 mSv) Dose causing symptoms of radiation poisoning if received in a short time (400 mSv, but varies) Dose received by two Fukushima plant workers (180 mSv) EPA quidelines for emergency situations, provided to ensure quick decision-making: Severe radiation = o (1 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers protecting valuable property (100 mSv) poisoning, in some cases fatal (2000 mSv, 2 Sv) Ten minutes next to the Chernobyl reactor core af ter explosion and meltdown (50 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers in lifesaving operations (250 mSv) Usually fatal radiation poisoning. Survival occa- sionally possible with prompt treatment (4 Sv" Sources: Fatal dose, even with treatment (8 Sv) http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ctr/parto20/ www.nema.ne.gov/technological/dose-limits.html http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/dose-calculator.cfm http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/radiation_guide.cfm http://mitnse.com/ http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/Chapter_8.pdf http://dels-old.nas.edu/dels/rpt_briefs/rerf-final.pdf http://people.reed.edu/"emcmanis/radiation.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert http://blog.vornaskotti.com/2010/07/15/into-the-zone-chernobyl-pripyat/ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/tzact-sheets/tritium-radiation-fs.html http://www.mext.go.jp/component/a_menu/other/detail/--icsFiles/afieldfile/2011/03/18/1303727-1716.pdf http://radiology.rsna.org/content/248/1/254 Chart by Randall Munroe, with help from Ellen, Senior Reactor Operator at the Reed Research Reactor, who suggested the idea and provided a lot of the sources. I'm sure I've added in lots of mistakes; it's for general education only. If you're basing radiation safety procedures on an internet PNG image and things go wrong, you have no one to blame but yourself. Radiation Dose Chart This is a chart of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the cells of the body. One sievert (all at once) will make you sick, and too many more will kill you, but we safely absorb small amounts of natural radiation dai ly. Note: The same number of sieverts absorbed in a shorter time will generally cause more damage, but your cumulative long-term dose plays a big role in things like cancer risk. Bn EPA yearly release target for D a nuclear power plant (30 uSv) I Sleeping next to someone (0.05 uSv) O Chest x-ray (20 uSv) Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant for a year (0.09 uSv) ALl the doses in the blue Ha chart combined (-60 uSv) Dose from spending an hour on the grounds at the Chernobyi plant in 2010 (6 mSv in one spot, but varies wildly) E Eating one banana (0.1 HSV) Extra dose to Tokyo in weeks following i Fukushima accident (40 mSv) Living within 50 miles of a coal power plant for a year (0.3 HSv) Living in a stone, brick, or concrete 品 bui lding for a year (70 uSv) Arm x-ray (1 HSv) Using a CRT monitor for a year (1 uSv) Average total dose from the Three HH Mile island accident to someone living within 10 miles (80 uSv) Extra dose from spending one day in an area with higher-than-average natural background radiation, such as the Colorado plateau (1.2 uSv) Chest CT scan (7 mSv) Approximate total dose received at Fukushima Town Hall over two weeks following accident (100 uSv) EPA year ly release limit for a nuclear Maximum year ly dose permitted for US radiation workers (50 mSv) Dental x-ray (5 uSv) power plant (250 HSv) Year ly dose from natural potassium in the body (390 uSv) Mammogram (400 usv) Background dose received by an average person over one normal day (10 HSv) EPA year ly limit on radiation exposure to a single member of the public (1 mSv-1,000 HSV) Maximum external dose from Three Mile Island accident (1 mSv) Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 uSv) Typical dose over two weeks in Fuku- shima Exclusion Zone (1 mSv, but areas northwest saw far higher doses) Head CT Scan (2 mSv) Normal year ly background dose. About 85% is from natural sources. Near ly all of the rest is from medical scans (~4 mSv) Using a cell phone (0 uSv)-a cell phone's transmitter does not produce ionizing radiation* and does not cause cancer. * Unless it's a bananaphone. (0.05 uSv) Radiation worker one-year dose limit (50 mSv) Approximate total dos one station at the north- west edge of the Fukushima exclusion zone (40 mSv) O * ALl doses in green chart combined (~75 mSv) Lowest one-year dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk (100 mSv) = o (20 uSV) O (10 mSv) Dose causing symptoms of radiation poisoning if received in a short time (400 mSv, but varies) Dose received by two Fukushima plant workers (180 mSv) EPA quidelines for emergency situations, provided to ensure quick decision-making: Severe radiation = o (1 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers protecting valuable property (100 mSv) poisoning, in some cases fatal (2000 mSv, 2 Sv) Ten minutes next to the Chernobyl reactor core af ter explosion and meltdown (50 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers in lifesaving operations (250 mSv) Usually fatal radiation poisoning. Survival occa- sionally possible with prompt treatment (4 Sv" Sources: Fatal dose, even with treatment (8 Sv) http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ctr/parto20/ www.nema.ne.gov/technological/dose-limits.html http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/dose-calculator.cfm http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/radiation_guide.cfm http://mitnse.com/ http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/Chapter_8.pdf http://dels-old.nas.edu/dels/rpt_briefs/rerf-final.pdf http://people.reed.edu/"emcmanis/radiation.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert http://blog.vornaskotti.com/2010/07/15/into-the-zone-chernobyl-pripyat/ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/tzact-sheets/tritium-radiation-fs.html http://www.mext.go.jp/component/a_menu/other/detail/--icsFiles/afieldfile/2011/03/18/1303727-1716.pdf http://radiology.rsna.org/content/248/1/254 Chart by Randall Munroe, with help from Ellen, Senior Reactor Operator at the Reed Research Reactor, who suggested the idea and provided a lot of the sources. I'm sure I've added in lots of mistakes; it's for general education only. If you're basing radiation safety procedures on an internet PNG image and things go wrong, you have no one to blame but yourself. Radiation Dose Chart This is a chart of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the cells of the body. One sievert (all at once) will make you sick, and too many more will kill you, but we safely absorb small amounts of natural radiation dai ly. Note: The same number of sieverts absorbed in a shorter time will generally cause more damage, but your cumulative long-term dose plays a big role in things like cancer risk. Bn EPA yearly release target for D a nuclear power plant (30 uSv) I Sleeping next to someone (0.05 uSv) O Chest x-ray (20 uSv) Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant for a year (0.09 uSv) ALl the doses in the blue Ha chart combined (-60 uSv) Dose from spending an hour on the grounds at the Chernobyi plant in 2010 (6 mSv in one spot, but varies wildly) E Eating one banana (0.1 HSV) Extra dose to Tokyo in weeks following i Fukushima accident (40 mSv) Living within 50 miles of a coal power plant for a year (0.3 HSv) Living in a stone, brick, or concrete 品 bui lding for a year (70 uSv) Arm x-ray (1 HSv) Using a CRT monitor for a year (1 uSv) Average total dose from the Three HH Mile island accident to someone living within 10 miles (80 uSv) Extra dose from spending one day in an area with higher-than-average natural background radiation, such as the Colorado plateau (1.2 uSv) Chest CT scan (7 mSv) Approximate total dose received at Fukushima Town Hall over two weeks following accident (100 uSv) EPA year ly release limit for a nuclear Maximum year ly dose permitted for US radiation workers (50 mSv) Dental x-ray (5 uSv) power plant (250 HSv) Year ly dose from natural potassium in the body (390 uSv) Mammogram (400 usv) Background dose received by an average person over one normal day (10 HSv) EPA year ly limit on radiation exposure to a single member of the public (1 mSv-1,000 HSV) Maximum external dose from Three Mile Island accident (1 mSv) Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 uSv) Typical dose over two weeks in Fuku- shima Exclusion Zone (1 mSv, but areas northwest saw far higher doses) Head CT Scan (2 mSv) Normal year ly background dose. About 85% is from natural sources. Near ly all of the rest is from medical scans (~4 mSv) Using a cell phone (0 uSv)-a cell phone's transmitter does not produce ionizing radiation* and does not cause cancer. * Unless it's a bananaphone. (0.05 uSv) Radiation worker one-year dose limit (50 mSv) Approximate total dos one station at the north- west edge of the Fukushima exclusion zone (40 mSv) O * ALl doses in green chart combined (~75 mSv) Lowest one-year dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk (100 mSv) = o (20 uSV) O (10 mSv) Dose causing symptoms of radiation poisoning if received in a short time (400 mSv, but varies) Dose received by two Fukushima plant workers (180 mSv) EPA quidelines for emergency situations, provided to ensure quick decision-making: Severe radiation = o (1 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers protecting valuable property (100 mSv) poisoning, in some cases fatal (2000 mSv, 2 Sv) Ten minutes next to the Chernobyl reactor core af ter explosion and meltdown (50 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers in lifesaving operations (250 mSv) Usually fatal radiation poisoning. Survival occa- sionally possible with prompt treatment (4 Sv" Sources: Fatal dose, even with treatment (8 Sv) http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ctr/parto20/ www.nema.ne.gov/technological/dose-limits.html http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/dose-calculator.cfm http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/radiation_guide.cfm http://mitnse.com/ http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/Chapter_8.pdf http://dels-old.nas.edu/dels/rpt_briefs/rerf-final.pdf http://people.reed.edu/"emcmanis/radiation.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert http://blog.vornaskotti.com/2010/07/15/into-the-zone-chernobyl-pripyat/ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/tzact-sheets/tritium-radiation-fs.html http://www.mext.go.jp/component/a_menu/other/detail/--icsFiles/afieldfile/2011/03/18/1303727-1716.pdf http://radiology.rsna.org/content/248/1/254 Chart by Randall Munroe, with help from Ellen, Senior Reactor Operator at the Reed Research Reactor, who suggested the idea and provided a lot of the sources. I'm sure I've added in lots of mistakes; it's for general education only. If you're basing radiation safety procedures on an internet PNG image and things go wrong, you have no one to blame but yourself. Radiation Dose Chart This is a chart of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the cells of the body. One sievert (all at once) will make you sick, and too many more will kill you, but we safely absorb small amounts of natural radiation dai ly. Note: The same number of sieverts absorbed in a shorter time will generally cause more damage, but your cumulative long-term dose plays a big role in things like cancer risk. Bn EPA yearly release target for D a nuclear power plant (30 uSv) I Sleeping next to someone (0.05 uSv) O Chest x-ray (20 uSv) Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant for a year (0.09 uSv) ALl the doses in the blue Ha chart combined (-60 uSv) Dose from spending an hour on the grounds at the Chernobyi plant in 2010 (6 mSv in one spot, but varies wildly) E Eating one banana (0.1 HSV) Extra dose to Tokyo in weeks following i Fukushima accident (40 mSv) Living within 50 miles of a coal power plant for a year (0.3 HSv) Living in a stone, brick, or concrete 品 bui lding for a year (70 uSv) Arm x-ray (1 HSv) Using a CRT monitor for a year (1 uSv) Average total dose from the Three HH Mile island accident to someone living within 10 miles (80 uSv) Extra dose from spending one day in an area with higher-than-average natural background radiation, such as the Colorado plateau (1.2 uSv) Chest CT scan (7 mSv) Approximate total dose received at Fukushima Town Hall over two weeks following accident (100 uSv) EPA year ly release limit for a nuclear Maximum year ly dose permitted for US radiation workers (50 mSv) Dental x-ray (5 uSv) power plant (250 HSv) Year ly dose from natural potassium in the body (390 uSv) Mammogram (400 usv) Background dose received by an average person over one normal day (10 HSv) EPA year ly limit on radiation exposure to a single member of the public (1 mSv-1,000 HSV) Maximum external dose from Three Mile Island accident (1 mSv) Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 uSv) Typical dose over two weeks in Fuku- shima Exclusion Zone (1 mSv, but areas northwest saw far higher doses) Head CT Scan (2 mSv) Normal year ly background dose. About 85% is from natural sources. Near ly all of the rest is from medical scans (~4 mSv) Using a cell phone (0 uSv)-a cell phone's transmitter does not produce ionizing radiation* and does not cause cancer. * Unless it's a bananaphone. (0.05 uSv) Radiation worker one-year dose limit (50 mSv) Approximate total dos one station at the north- west edge of the Fukushima exclusion zone (40 mSv) O * ALl doses in green chart combined (~75 mSv) Lowest one-year dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk (100 mSv) = o (20 uSV) O (10 mSv) Dose causing symptoms of radiation poisoning if received in a short time (400 mSv, but varies) Dose received by two Fukushima plant workers (180 mSv) EPA quidelines for emergency situations, provided to ensure quick decision-making: Severe radiation = o (1 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers protecting valuable property (100 mSv) poisoning, in some cases fatal (2000 mSv, 2 Sv) Ten minutes next to the Chernobyl reactor core af ter explosion and meltdown (50 Sv) Dose limit for emergency workers in lifesaving operations (250 mSv) Usually fatal radiation poisoning. Survival occa- sionally possible with prompt treatment (4 Sv" Sources: Fatal dose, even with treatment (8 Sv) http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/ctr/parto20/ www.nema.ne.gov/technological/dose-limits.html http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/dose-calculator.cfm http://www.deq.idaho.gov/inl_oversight/radiation/radiation_guide.cfm http://mitnse.com/ http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/Chapter_8.pdf http://dels-old.nas.edu/dels/rpt_briefs/rerf-final.pdf http://people.reed.edu/"emcmanis/radiation.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert http://blog.vornaskotti.com/2010/07/15/into-the-zone-chernobyl-pripyat/ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/tzact-sheets/tritium-radiation-fs.html http://www.mext.go.jp/component/a_menu/other/detail/--icsFiles/afieldfile/2011/03/18/1303727-1716.pdf http://radiology.rsna.org/content/248/1/254 Chart by Randall Munroe, with help from Ellen, Senior Reactor Operator at the Reed Research Reactor, who suggested the idea and provided a lot of the sources. I'm sure I've added in lots of mistakes; it's for general education only. If you're basing radiation safety procedures on an internet PNG image and things go wrong, you have no one to blame but yourself.

Radiation Dose Chart

shared by Anonymous (not verified) on Feb 08
1,751 views
2 shares
0 comments
This is a chart of the ionization radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. The unit for absorbed dose is "sievert" (Sv), and measures the effect a dose of radiation will have on the ce...

Publisher


Category

Science
Did you work on this visual? Claim credit!

Get a Quote

Embed Code

For hosted site:

Click the code to copy

For wordpress.com:

Click the code to copy
Customize size