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Is Your Rock a Conflict Diamond?

a conflicr Rock Diamond Conflict diamonds, also known as blood diamonds, are diamonds used to fund war related conflict in central and western Africa. Rebel, military, and terrorist groups in many parts of Africa run a brutal diamond industry which provides them with the funds necessary to pur- chase weapons and continue their reign of terror. Before you buy that diamond engagement ring, ask yourself one simple questions: "When I hold this ring, do I have blood on my hands?" Wars in which conflict diamonds were traded for weapons: 1985 Partnership Africa Canada launches to regulate a legal d industry. Ivory Coast (A.K.A Cote d'Ivoire): Diamonds fuled civil war from 1999-200. 1986 Sierra Leone: Diamonds fueled civil war from 1991-2002. Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC): Diamonds fueled civil war from 1997-1999. 1987 Liberia: Diamonds fuled civil war from 1989-2003. 1980 s: 19% of the diamond industry purpetuated violence. 1988 Republic of Congo: Diamonds fuled civil war from 1997-2003. 1989 Angola: While civil war lasted from 1975-2002, diamonds fueled the wars from 1992-1999. Cote d'Ivoire begins diamond mining in industry. 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 = 10,000 Lives Conflict diamond wars have cost 3.7 million lives. 1992 - 1998: National Union for Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) sold $3.72 billion worth of dia- monds to fund civil war. 1995 Global Witness becomes the 1st organization to make the link between diamonds and conflictsGlobal Witness becomes the first organization to make the link between diamonds and conflicts. 1996 In the late 90's, conflict diamonds made up for 4% of the world's diamond industry. The UN Security Council Resolution 1173 passed to begin restricting diamond funding for war. 1997 Conflict diamonds are reduced to 3.06% according to the World Diamond Council. 1998 Cote d'Ivoire becomes route for exporting diamonds between Liberia and Sierra Leone. 1999 Today, the Kimberly Process has reduced this number to 1% and 74 governments have adopted KPCS. a Conflict Free Diamond How to Identify UN accuses Liberian president of exchanging weapons for diamonds. 2000 UN accuses Liberian president of exchanging weapons for diamonds. Bill Clinton passed Executive Order 13194 prohibiting the import of conflict diamonds from the Sierra Leone. Request diamonds from Canada or the US who make up for 6% of the world's diamond industry. 2001 UN applies sanctions on Libe- rian diamond trade. diamonds and Canada passes the Export and Import of Rough Dia- monds Act which controls the importing, exporting, and sales of diamonds in Canada. 2002 lating that the Liberian president, Charles G. Taylor, steps down as president diamond is conflict free 2003 US launched the Clean Dia- mond Trade Act which States KPCS for the United UN bans all diamond exports from Cote d'Ivoire. The Republic of Congo is expelled from the Kimberly Process for falsifying certificates of origin The movie Blood Diamond releases, to educate movie-goers about the conflict diamond industry. 2004 Conflict diamonds are reduced to 1% of the diamond industry according to World Diamond Council. Charles G. Taylor is tried for crimes against humanity in connection to his conflict 2005 diamond related war crimes. The Republic of Congo is allowed back into the Kimberly Process. 2006 In many ways, UN Policies have made the diamond industry in Africa legal and safe. Therefore, buying from Africa is not off the tab. 65% of diamonds come from Africa. 2007 5 million people have obtained health care in Africa because of legal diamond trade. Diamond industry revenues go towards AIDS/HIV research and treatment in Africa. Africa's diamond industry has legally infused $8.4 billion into the economy. Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_diamond http://www.un.org/peace/africa/Diamond.html http://www.amnestyusa.org/business-and-human-rights/extractives/conflict-diamonds/page.do?id-1051176 http://www.amnestyusa.org/diamonds/rtf/CD_DL_ActionGuide_Feb2007.pdf http://www.diamondfacts.org/conflict/backgroundhtml http://www.diamondfacts.org/confidence/index.html http://www.diamondfacts.org/pdfs/industry/ConsumerBrochure.pdf http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/smm-mms/busi-indu/dpn-npd-eng.htm Is Your Ask to see a certificate from the suppliers e of conflict Be aware where they co %24

Is Your Rock a Conflict Diamond?

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Conflict diamonds, also known as blood diamonds, are diamonds used to fund war related conflict in Central and Western Africa. Rebel, military, and terrorist groups in many parts of Africa run a bruta...

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