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The Jolie Effect: How One Woman Shared Her Story and Made a Difference

Jelie Effect THE How one woman shared her story and made a difference In May of 2013, Angelina Jolie announced she had the BRCA1 gene mutation, greatly increasing her risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Following a preventive double mastectomy, Jolie published her story in The New York Times. Her article led to a dramatic increase in BRCA testing and awareness. New research from AARP's Public Policy Institute reveals that this so-called "Jolie Effect" has influenced the health behaviors of younger women and those without a history of cancer. Before Article : After Article +40% 100 Testing rate for BRCA Mutations 2x 50....... Google Search Rates for "BRCA" JAN APR MAY DEC BRCA Testing and Google Search volume rates normalized against top monthly value for 2013. The Jolie Effect on testing... ..Helped Women of All Races ...Influenced Women .Impacted Younger Women Without Cancer Without a previous cancer diagnosis +53% +40% +44% .4.. +43% +43% +23% +16% +33% With a previous ovarian, breast or pancreatic cancer diagnosis .1... 35-49 50-64 65+ White Hispanic Black Asian BRCA testing rates per 10,000 women for the four months before and after May 2013. +26% Women who have a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are... times more likely to get breast cancer 30 times more likely to get ovarian cancer than other women AARP Real Possibilities Study conducted using the Optum Labs database which i U.S. health insurance plan. This study is based on women ages 35 years and olderwho had a service claim for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing. Cancer rates comparing women before age 70, provided by Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Google Search results of 2013 searches for "BRCA" at google.com/trends. Public Policy Institute es retrospective administrative claims data from a large national

The Jolie Effect: How One Woman Shared Her Story and Made a Difference

shared by olsonchr on Feb 13
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In May of 2013, Angelina Jolie announced she had the BRCA1 gene mutation, greatly increasing her risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Following a preventive double mastectomy, Jolie published her story ...

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AARP

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Health
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