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The End of the World's Greatest Killer - The Potential Eradication of Malaria

The End of the World's Greatest Killer THE POTENTIAL ERADICATION OF MALARIA Malaria, a parasitic disease that is transmitted through mosquito bites, has threatened mankind for centuries. Despite a known cure, malaria is still present in 108 countries. But, recent advances have led scientists to believe a vaccine for Malaria is possible by 2015. Below we look at the global devastation of malaria to find out if the end is truly near. Countries and Territories Where Malaria Is Eliminated The Mile-Long Route to Eradication According to the World Health Organization, 90 countries are malaria-free. 1820: Quinine is purified from tree bark and used to treat malaria. Malaria eliminated 1955-1972 Malaria eliminated 1973-1999 I Malaria eliminated 2000-2010 Countries considered in the control phase Countries considered endemic Current Status of the Malaria Epidemic Worldwide Number of Countries Considered Number of Countries Number of Countries in Elimination or Pre Considered in the Region Malaria-Free Elimination Phase Control Phase 10 30 40 50 10 20 30 40 50 10 20 30 40 50 African Region American Region Eastern Mediterranean Region European Region South-East Asia Region 1934: Anti-malaria drug Chloroquine is discovered. Western Pacific Region Malaria infects 1 in 10 of the world's population. In Africa, a child dies every 45 seconds of malaria, accounting for approximately 20 percent of all childhood deaths in the region. 1957: First documented case of resistance to Chloroquine is reported. Malaria Deaths Worldwide In 2010, 289 million ITNS were delivered to sub-Saharan Africa, only enough to cover 76 percent of the 765 million 1.000,000 985,000 1976: A parasite is successfully grown in culture, and vaccine research is possible. 800,000 781,000 1989: Anti-malaria drug Mefloquine Hydrochloride is approved. 600,000 people at risk. 1992: Malaria vaccine candidate RTS,S is developed and enters clinical trials. 1996: Mosquito nets treated with insecticides, now commonly known as insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNS) are shown to reduce overall childhood mortaliity by 20 percent. 400,000 Previously, only 42 percent of households owned ITNS, 200,000 - and only 35 percent of children slept under an ITN. 2010: The final stage of clinical trials of Mosquirix find it halves the risk of African children getting malaria. 2000 2009 2015: The vaccine is set to be licensed and hit the market. Despite a 20 percent drop in malaria deaths, WHO reports that the number of people infected with the disease has stayed relatively consistent over the last decade at 200+ million per year. Mosquirix works by stimulating the immune response once a parasite enters the human bloodstream after a mosquito bite. It can prevent the parasite from maturing and multiplying in the liver. The battle for eradication of Malaria is far from over, but with the promise of a vaccine comes hope for a Malaria free future. SOURCES: UUU UUu assay depot NATIONMASTER.COM BBC.CO.UK REUTERS.COM WHO.INT/EN MALARIAHOTSPOTS.cO.UK

The End of the World's Greatest Killer - The Potential Eradication of Malaria

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Malaria, a parasite disease that is transmitted through mosquito bites, has threatened mankind for centuries. Despite a known cure, malaria is still present in 108 countries, But, recent advances have...

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