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Global Emissions Since Kyoto

Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Oceania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Mexico 4,302 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 Ra Cony Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 10,000 ল Cumanisunds 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 40,500 59 Serbia Montenego 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 61 Switzerland 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 বর Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° R02 East Timgr merstan 59 Bargladeh 700,000 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 213 Cenk hid Checklist of success 65% Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 8% 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Осeania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Меxico 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 4,302 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% e 178 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 143 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 群 Ra Cony Rne Caty a Cy Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 8 Fatagel 10,000 Cumanisunds 41 Jama 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 59 Serbia Montenego GO Lie 61 Switzerland 42 Mar 40,500 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison H Ktan Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 2 Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° lnd merstan 59 Bargladeh R02 East Timgr 700,000 2 bethean 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah Z Montseat 213 Cenk hid A Pladistnds us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 21 berte k 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 125 Eapa Checklist of success 65% 218 Mur Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 8% 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Осeania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Меxico 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 4,302 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% e 178 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 143 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 群 Ra Cony Rne Caty a Cy Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 8 Fatagel 10,000 Cumanisunds 41 Jama 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 59 Serbia Montenego GO Lie 61 Switzerland 42 Mar 40,500 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison H Ktan Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 2 Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° lnd merstan 59 Bargladeh R02 East Timgr 700,000 2 bethean 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah Z Montseat 213 Cenk hid A Pladistnds us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 21 berte k 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 125 Eapa Checklist of success 65% 218 Mur Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 8% 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Осeania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Меxico 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 4,302 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% e 178 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 143 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 群 Ra Cony Rne Caty a Cy Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 8 Fatagel 10,000 Cumanisunds 41 Jama 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 59 Serbia Montenego GO Lie 61 Switzerland 42 Mar 40,500 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison H Ktan Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 2 Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° lnd merstan 59 Bargladeh R02 East Timgr 700,000 2 bethean 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah Z Montseat 213 Cenk hid A Pladistnds us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 21 berte k 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 125 Eapa Checklist of success 65% 218 Mur Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 8% 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Осeania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Меxico 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 4,302 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% e 178 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 143 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 群 Ra Cony Rne Caty a Cy Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 8 Fatagel 10,000 Cumanisunds 41 Jama 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 59 Serbia Montenego GO Lie 61 Switzerland 42 Mar 40,500 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison H Ktan Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 2 Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° lnd merstan 59 Bargladeh R02 East Timgr 700,000 2 bethean 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah Z Montseat 213 Cenk hid A Pladistnds us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 21 berte k 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 125 Eapa Checklist of success 65% 218 Mur Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON Global emissions Eurasia 26,397mesef Co2 17% 49 Sweden s6 Finland 668 606 since Kyoto - 1997 to 2007 Arrows show difference in country's annual carbon emissions between 23 Netherlands growth is anissions quer the peried 2,850 54 Denmarlk 644 1997 and 2007 8 UK 6,281 7 Canada 3 Russia 17,360 6,385 26 27 Belgium 1,619 Kazakhstan 1,790 -1% 52 Belarus 8% 649 15% 6 Germany 9,487 20 Poland 3,308 35 Uzbekistan 1,237 12 France 4,466 18 Ukraine 3,722 -6% 44 38 Czech Rep 1,045 North Korea 65 769 1 US 9 South Korea 5,059 43 Austria a SS Hungar 781 64,166 17 Spain 3,740 10 Italy 4,997 37 Romania 1,112 59 sartia million tonnes Montenege A S19 48 Portugal 678 57 Bulgaria S59 180 7% 36 Greece 1,124 2 China Europe 50,370msd c2 4 Japan 13,342 24 Turkey 140-209 45,301 2,313 North America 74,867m co2 Serbia Montenegro sincesepation 1997 to 2007 5% e the pe million tonnes grth in emissio 9% 1997 to 2007 growth in ensuons 102% Middle East 13,547m d con 1997 to 2007 growthin emissions 15 Iran 4,128 22 Taiwan 2,909 Asia & Осeania 34 Pakistan 30 Egypt 1,497 1240 13 Меxico 40 Algeria 941 60 Libya SIR 4,302 58 Syria Hong Kong 735 197. 41 Irag 883 tomes of C02 206 47 Irael 53 Vietnam 647 Africa 10,552m 20 25% 39 Nigeria 46 Kuwait Philippines 794 64% wonth inemssions Dr the peried 167 703 1,028 28 Venezuela 72 25 Thailand 2,194 tonnes of CO2 1,589 1S1 -205 19 Saudi Arabia 3,663 5 India 11,870 growth in emieiom C the period 160 31 Malaysia 1,454 Central & South America 11,461m 26% theped 162 S1 Colombia 21 Indonesia 200 3,049 60% 198 16 Brazil 3,881 11 South Africa 4,504 202 201 Soes el Co2 1997 to 2007 208 World 283,500m: 29% e 178 32 UAE 1,429 33 Singapore 1,307 143 203 - 213 50 Chile 656 growth in emissione tomes of CO2 1997 te 2007 14 Australia 4,203 29 Argentina 1,544 -214 CO2 emissions Global warming Total carbon emissions, 1997-2007 群 Ra Cony Rne Caty a Cy Annual global emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement, million tonnes of CO2 Change in global average near-surface temperature trend, relative to 1861-1900 average 20,000 0.75 The summit in numbers Earth has warmed 0.7C since around 1900 ERI Antigua Baula 136 Cinbadia 15,000 0.5 D2 Metheland Antiles 8 Fatagel 10,000 Cumanisunds 41 Jama 142 Nambiu 143 New Caledenia 144 Maitiniue 145 Madagsca 87 CentalAtrican BepuI 15,000 5,000 53 Vietro 54 Denmail 55 Hungary 5G Einknd 57 Burori Gutenla 99 Amenia 100 Kenya 1O Macedone L88 Se Luria 644 190 US. Pacitc hlands 191 Gamba Number of delegates expected to attend afficial Copenhagen summit 21 -0.75 1850 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 1850 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 192 Western Sahora 193 Antaictia SOURCE: WORLD esORCES RSTITUTE n grOM STERHREORTI SOURCE: ROHAN ET AL 200E TRO STE EP 90 59 Serbia Montenego GO Lie 61 Switzerland 42 Mar 40,500 104 Latviu 194 GIRadu 150 Djbouti 51 Meaamb 152 Snme Mongeis 195 Leoths The key issues at Copenhagen 106 MoldovI 107 Cameison H Ktan Tonnes of carbon dioxide predicted to be emitted by those delegates while at the summit 197 Cape ek 3322 2 Curb carbon in developing world Keep tabs on funds and emissions Slow the speed of deforestation Clean technology Cut carbon in rich world Pay the price for climate change 6° lnd merstan 59 Bargladeh R02 East Timgr 700,000 2 bethean 13 FISakorde 204 Sane K Nevis 205 Cemas bos Dominica 207 Sas Torme Shincipe 208 Vantu 209 Mosterg 210 St Pierre Migueloe 211 Vigin isard, Bitah Z Montseat 213 Cenk hid A Pladistnds us Costa Rica 159 Guinea 160 Wabu ilard Cost in euras af replacing outdated brick kilns in Bangladesh, paid for by Danish govemment to offset those emissions Scientists say cuts of 25-401. by 2020 are needed, relative to 1990 levels, rising ta 80-956 by 2050. Develaped countries have grawn rich on fossil fuels and still emit vast amounts of Co2 per person, so have a responsibil- ity to make deepest cuts. About 17% of the carbon emitted by human activity comes from razing forests. But paying people not to fell trees soon becomes complex. Who really owns them? Were they actually going to be chopped down? How do you verify the whole process? Emissions from fast-growing economies such as China and India are All agree that the poorest nations need urgent aid, having done nothing to pollute the atmosphere. It will also Poorer nations want to continue Paying for clean technology is just the start, as the products and services 24 Kaktan 27 Belm 21 berte k 116 Ghna surging, yet their citizens have small carbon foatprints and millions live in poverty. So they'll argue they need ta br allowed to pollute for a while yet as they improve their citizens' lives. Kyoto's top-down approach, with clear responsibilities placed on rich cauntries. Developing nations alsa want climate funds distributed by the UN, whereas developed countries would prefer the World Bank. required must be developed and 163 Buikina Faso 164 French Gat 165 Alghanistas 166 Sia Leane 167 Arubo 29 Aupertna 114 Seaeal cost a lot to create the clean tech- halogy essential far slashing global emissions. In both cases, rich natians will be expected to pick up the tab deployed rapidly and efficiently all over er the globe. But nations differ on whether a strong international body is needed, or just an advisory one. 121 Bahamas 132 Micarague 123 Betswana $62m+ 32 United Arab Emirates Estimated cost to Danish gavernment of staging the event 1G8 Fntres 125 Eapa Checklist of success 65% 218 Mur Developing nations commit to a 15-30% cut on the emissions levels expected in 2020. Chance of success: Good Richer nations commit to funding poorer ones, and clean technologY, to tune of $200bn+ per year. Deal done on who monitors countries' carbon emissions and distributes the money. Agreement which delivers cash to forested nations, meaning far fewer trees are cut down. Deal that delivers a radical overhaul in the deployment of clean technology. 29 Matus 110 Paaue Ne Gne 131 Eqatorial Guirea 112 Ieeland 133 Mautanie 174 Farnelsknds 175 Somilia 176 Maldives Rich nations commit to a Minimum proportion af food and drink provided to delegates that will be organic The data is the latent awiahle compiled be the combined reduction in greenhouse gases of 25-40% by 2020. Chance of success: Middling Environnent infermation Administation, part of the US Depertment of Enerer. Althouchnewer data is avalatle from other serces, the EIAIS the only credible seurce of carbon ermissions for ewer r Ceentry in the world. 179 Greenland Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Low Chance of success: Good Chance of success: Fair DATA SIMON ROGERS, GAC MI SEUTON

Global Emissions Since Kyoto

shared by visually on Jun 09
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This visualization looks at how total national carbon emissions from energy use have changed from the last major climate treaty in 1997 to the latest summit at Copenhagen.

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The Guardian

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Environment
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