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The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective

The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 6007 2008 /007 9007 $1,250 so0z 2004 2003 2002 L02 000'I$ 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 OS4$ v661 1992 L661 0661 686L 8841 2861 1986 S861 1984 1983 $250 1982 1861 0861 Difference in percentage points (%) The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 $1,250 6007 2008 000'I$ 9007 so0z 2004 2003 2002 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 1992 L661 0661 686L $250 8841 2861 1986 1984 1983 Difference in percentage points (%) 1982 1861 0861 The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 $1,250 6007 2008 000'I$ 9007 so0z 2004 2003 2002 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 1992 L661 0661 686L $250 8841 2861 1986 1984 1983 Difference in percentage points (%) 1982 1861 0861 The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 $1,250 6007 2008 000'I$ 9007 so0z 2004 2003 2002 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 1992 L661 0661 686L $250 8841 2861 1986 1984 1983 Difference in percentage points (%) 1982 1861 0861 The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 $1,250 6007 2008 000'I$ 9007 so0z 2004 2003 2002 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 1992 L661 0661 686L $250 8841 2861 1986 1984 1983 Difference in percentage points (%) 1982 1861 0861 The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective Throughout history, women have been paid less than men; this male-female income disparity has been called the "gender wage gap." While some differences in occupation, experience and hours worked play a role in this gap, studies claim that even when those factors are controlled, a pay gap remains. The median annual earnings Full year workers, adjusted to 2009 dollars Percentage difference XX.X between the female and male income Average male income Average female income 50,875 47,816 47.941 49,000 47,020 47,127 $ 50K 46,175 46,520 44,973 44,338 45,432 77.0 $ 40K 38,907 34,039 32,685 31,937 36,278 30,518 36,018 29,924 34,602 60.7 32,537 31,670 $ 30K 28,324 23,606 $ 20K $ 10K Potential causes HOURS WORKED JOB CHOICE MOTHERHOOD NEGOTIATING SALARIES MALE BIAS Since women tend to spend more time taking care of the home, they may work fewer hours than men, conse- quently earning less. Gender stereotypes may influence a woman's job choice, and emplo- yer discrimination According to some studies, men are perceived to have performed better than equally perfor- ming women, and males are usually hired over female applicants. Since women may go on maternity leave (sometimes indefinitely), emplo- yers are hesitant to put them in higher- paying positions. Men are more likely to negotiate salary increases, and if women do, they frequently receive less of an increase. may steer a woman into a lower-paying job. The Equal Pay Act, 1963 1963 • I's a United States federal law that abolished wage disparity based on sex • It was signed on June 10 by John F. Kennedy REASONS Sex discrimination can depress employe- es' wages and living standards. The labor force wasn't being utili- zed to its maximum potential. Discrimination can lead to labor dispu- tes, which can impact commerce. There was unfair competition in the workforce. CONSEQUENCES: Women's wages have risen since the EPA's enactment 62% of men's earnings 80% of men's earnings 1970 2004 Other law proposals followed the EPA, as its goals have not been completely achieved: 2005 • Paycheck Fairness Act, presented on April 20 by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Representative Rosa Delauro first introduced an identical bill in the House of Representatives on the same day. 2009 • Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, signed into law on January 29 by President Barack Obama. Which paychecks are smaller Women's median weekly earnings compared to men's Entertainment, education, law O Science, computers, health care Management, business, financial Production, transportation Service, sales, office + 40 % PHYSICIAN & SURGEON FINANCIAL MANAGER + 35 % COMPLIANCE OFFICER + 30 % INSPECTOR & TESTER SUPERVISOR NETWORK ANALYST BARTENDER + 25 % DESIGNER PROFESSOR + 20 % CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR + 15 % PHARMACIST POLICE OFFICER BUS DRIVER + 10 % + 5 % DATA ENTRY KEYER Women's median weekly earnings A shift in pay? While women have historically been paid less, recent economic troubles may be changing that, according to The Wall Street Journal. A 2010 study showed that women who are: earned 8% SINGLE more than their male CHILDLESS counterparts. URBAN WORKERS BETWEEN 22 and 30 FEMALE MALE Some causes EDUCATION UNEMPLOYMENT GENDER-PREFERRED JOBS PARTICIPATION URBAN OPPORTUNITIES This may be a consequence of women outpacing men in education and consequently ending up in more knowledge-based jobs. The unemployment rate for men is Men are more likely to work in fields that are often impacted by the economy, líke construction. The labor force participation per- centage for men has dropped more than that for Between 2000 and 2005, women in their twenties earned more than their male counter- parts in some large urban centers: greater than it is for women. CURRENTLY OUT OF WORK OVER THE AGE OF 16 women. PARTICIPATION Women DALLAS 120% 58.8% 58.3% NEW YORK117% 8.3% of women Mar. '10 TODAY Men 71.4% 70.4% 9.3% of men Mar. '10 TODAY Sources: Institute for Women's Policy Research | OECD | University of California | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times | CREDITSCORE U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Information provided by: http://www.creditscore.net $1,500 $1,250 6007 2008 000'I$ 9007 so0z 2004 2003 2002 0007 6661 R661 2661 966L S661 1992 L661 0661 686L $250 8841 2861 1986 1984 1983 Difference in percentage points (%) 1982 1861 0861

The Gender Wage Gap: A Historical Perspective

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This infographic provides a timeline for the work history of woman in the work place. It sorts through the causes of women getting paid less than men. Ultimately it determines that even when you keep ...

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